As it prepares for its next phase of expansion, data quality vendor Global-Z International announces the appointment of Roger Matus to the newly created position of Vice President, Global Marketing.  In this role, Matus will be tasked with growing the awareness of Global-Z world-wide and will oversee all aspects of brand communications, product marketing, new product strategy, and demand generation.

“As we enter the next phase to grow in the multi-billion dollar data quality marketplace, Global-Z continues to attract the top talent in the industry”, said Dimitri Garder founder and CEO.

Matus joined Global-Z from artificial intelligence company Neurala, where as Vice President of Products and Markets, he led the roll-out of the company’s products to Fortune 50 companies and a global audience. He was also Executive Vice President of Nellymoser, an innovator in print-to-mobile technology for the publishing industry, and Vice President of Marketing for Dragon Systems, the leader in speech recognition software.  He has an MBA from the University of Chicago, an MS in Engineering from Boston University, and a BA from Syracuse University.

“We are extremely excited to have such a seasoned executive as Roger Matus joining our team,” said Ted Haas, Chief Marketing Officer of Global-Z.  “Roger brings to Global-Z not only strong global marketing expertise but also a strong track record in expanding markets for technology companies.”

“As large companies increasingly rely upon their in-house databases to make predictions, and for enterprise customer communications, I believe that the market for Global-Z’s data quality services will expand dramatically.  Global-Z’s ability to customize data hygiene services at scale for complex environments will make the company a critical partner in the customer’s growth.  I am thrilled to be a part of it,” Matus said.

During his free time, Matus likes to take advantage of everything the Berkshires has to offer, including yoga, hiking, concerts, and theater.

ABOUT GLOBAL-Z INTERNATIONAL

Global-Z International is focused on improving customer data quality and intelligence in global markets. Today Global-Z serves some of the largest global enterprises with customized international data quality solutions for their marketing, CRM migration and master data management needs. Global-Z International, Inc., was founded in 1989 and is headquartered in Bennington, Vermont with offices and operations in the US, Canada and Japan.

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Privacy-Shield-Framework

Global-Z International Inc., a leader in global data quality, is pleased to announce they have achieved approval for the Swiss   Privacy Shield. This certification replaces Swiss-Safe Harbor. The certification details can be viewed on the Privacy Shield website here. This certification is in addition to the EU_US Privacy Shield certification granted in 2016.

The European Commission (EC) adopted the new EU-U.S. Privacy Shield on July 2016. Now the Privacy Shield framework protects the fundamental rights of anyone in the EU including Switzerland whose personal data is transferred to the United States, as well as bringing legal clarity for businesses relying on transatlantic data transfers.

For detailed information on the Privacy Shield regulations you can refer to our post here. We also include a post covering Privacy Shield’s most frequently asked questions.

Eircode Global-Z

~by Paul Harris, Marketing Manager

Global-Z International Inc. is proud to announce that it is one of the top global data quality vendors to be approved as a Eircode Provider.

Eircode is Ireland’s newly adopted postcode system. Eircode enables people and businesses to find every address in Ireland, helping to improve all our address hygiene and data quality solutions for Ireland contact data.

According the Eircode website, “Over 35% of addresses in Ireland share their address with at least one other property, making it difficult for those delivering goods and services to accurately identify the location of an address. Eircode has been designed specifically to overcome this problem. Unlike other countries where postcodes define a cluster or group of addresses, a unique Eircode is assigned to each residential and business address. Having an Eircode address, removes the hassle and mistakes out of finding addresses in Ireland.”

“Global-Z International is committed to improving our address solutions suite in Ireland and all around the world,” said Dimitri Garder, CEO of Global-Z International. “As the new Eircode system in Ireland begins to be adopted more widely our address verification results will see better overall accuracy for our clients.”

If you would like to discuss Eircode or our solutions for Ireland data in greater detail please feel free to contact us any time.

 

Privacy ShieldToday, we are proud to announce that Global-Z is one of the top global data quality vendors to certify with the new EU-US Privacy Shield by the U.S. Department of Commerce. Our self-certification was declared official and finalized during the 2016 holiday break on 12/27/2016.

The EU-U.S. Privacy Shield Framework was designed by the U.S. Department of Commerce and European Commission to provide companies on both sides of the Atlantic with a mechanism to comply with EU data protection requirements when transferring personal data from the European Union to the United States in support of transatlantic commerce.

“Global-Z International is committed to the privacy and security of our clients’ information globally,” said Dimitri Garder, CEO of Global-Z International. “In the new and rapidly changing age of personal data and information protection, Global-Z is committed to meet the challenges to protect all customer and client data.”
For detailed information on the Privacy Shield regulations you can refer to our post here. We also include a post covering Privacy Shield’s most frequently asked questions.

 

 

Canada_flagGlobal-Z would like to remind our clients and contacts who use Canada Post’s National Change of Address (CNCOA) Mover Data services that your annual NCOA Terms of Use agreement may be up for renewal. This can be renewed by contacting Canada Post directly and requesting your ID renewal.

An ID is valid for 12 months and you must re-accept Terms of Use before its expiry to avoid service interruptions. Please continue to ensure that all recipients of CNCOA Mover Data in your organization are aware of and understand the Terms of Use.

For more information on the changes made to Canada Post’s CNOCA services you can read our past blog post here. You can also visit the Canada Post website here.

If you have any questions or concerns about you CNCOA status, please don’t hesitate to Contact Us.

EU-US Privacy Shield~by Paul Harris, Global-Z Marketing Manager

Are you ready for the new Privacy Shield regulations? The new EU-US agreement is bringing some major changes for American businesses that process European customer data. While many more questions are yet to be answered about Privacy Shield’s impact, we collected the top most frequently asked questions to help you better understand the regulations.

 

 

  • What is Privacy Shield?
    • On July, 12th 2016 the European Commission (EC) adopted the new EU-U.S. Privacy Shield (formerly known as EU-US Safe Harbor). The new Privacy Shield framework protects the fundamental rights of anyone in the EU whose personal data is transferred to the United States, as well as bringing legal clarity for businesses relying on transatlantic data transfers.
    • Privacy Shield is a voluntary self-certification to the US Department of Commerce. Once a company publicly commits to Privacy Shield, it is enforceable under US law. It includes multiple avenues of redress to resolve complaints. The agreement is a ‘living commitment’ with annual reviews. Companies who certify with Privacy Shield must select an independent dispute resolution organization that include the following criteria.
      • Panel created by the EU Data Protection Authorities (DPA’s).
      • Accredited organization in EU.
      • Accredited organization in US.
  • What are the principals Privacy Shield is based on?
  • How does it affect my business?
    • From the perspective of U.S. companies, the framework has tightened restrictions on forwarding Europeans’ personal data to other companies. In the technology sector in particular this is going to require a lot more attentiveness on the part of those directly serving Europeans. The companies serving the customers will remain responsible for their personal data, even if the work is outsourced by subcontractors. Companies on the Privacy Shield register will also have to pledge to not collect more personal information that what they need for the purposes of their service.
  • When can we certify with Privacy Shield?
    • Going forward the Privacy Shield framework will be published in the US Federal Register. Once US companies have had an opportunity to review the framework and update their compliance, they will be able to certify with the US Department of Commerce starting August, 1st 2016. Companies should also assess Privacy Shield’s impact on their EU-U.S. data transfer strategy. In particular, there is a limited “grace period” available in that companies who self-certify within two months of Privacy Shield’s effective date will be given a nine month transitional period to address relationships with third parties.
  • Will it cost me to certify?
    • The total cost estimates are still unknown but costs will depend on your business size and a fee charged by your independent dispute resolution organization.
  • Does the recently announced “Brexit” (British exit from the EU) impact the new framework?
    • No, Brexit will have no immediate impact on Privacy Shield. The exit is expected to take at least two years minimum to fully occur and if changes happen within that timeframe, we will be sure to let you know.
  • Should I seek legal counsel?
    • Privacy Shield will be complex; we strongly recommend consulting legal counsel with international privacy law expertise.  If you would like to discuss Privacy Shield in greater detail and/or the specific impact on your company feel free to contact us any time.

For more information regarding the Privacy Shield framework please see the US International Trade Administration’s press release. Also, the US Department of Commerce has issued a “Fact Sheet” overview of the EU-US Privacy Shield Framework it can be viewed here.

EU-US Privacy Shield(Note: This article is an update on our first article about Privacy Shield posted in the February  2016 edition of GZ News.)

~by Paul Harris, Marketing Director

On July, 12th 2016 the European Commission (EC) adopted the new EU-U.S. Privacy Shield. The new Privacy Shield framework protects the fundamental rights of anyone in the EU whose personal data is transferred to the United States, as well as bringing legal clarity for businesses relying on transatlantic data transfers.

Global-Z CEO and Co-Founder Dimitri Garder said: “In the upcoming weeks and months we will update our clients and partners regarding how the new Privacy Shield framework will impact our global data processing solutions.”

According the press release issued by the European Commission, EU-U.S. Privacy Shield is based on the following principles:

  • Strong obligations on companies handling data. The U.S. Department of Commerce will conduct regular updates and reviews of participating companies, to ensure they follow the rules they submitted themselves to. If companies do not comply with them, they face sanctions and removal from the list. The tightening of conditions for the onward transfers of data to third parties will guarantee the same level of protection in case of a transfer from a Privacy Shield company.
  • Clear safeguards and transparency obligations on U.S. government access. The US has given the EU assurance that the access of public authorities for law enforcement and national security is subject to clear limitations, safeguards and oversight mechanisms. Everyone in the EU will, also for the first time, benefit from redress mechanisms in this area. The U.S. has ruled out indiscriminate mass surveillance on personal data transferred to the US under the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield arrangement. The Office of the Director of National Intelligence further clarified that bulk collection of data could only be used under specific preconditions and needs to be as targeted and focused as possible. It details the safeguards in place for the use of data under such exceptional circumstances. The U.S. Secretary of State has established a redress possibility in the area of national intelligence for Europeans through an Ombudsperson mechanism within the Department of State.
  • Effective protection of individual rights: Any EU citizen who considers that their data has been misused under the Privacy Shield scheme will benefit from several accessible and affordable dispute resolution mechanisms. Ideally, the complaint will be resolved by the company itself; or free of charge Alternative Dispute resolution (ADR) solutions will be offered. Individuals can also go to their national Data Protection Authorities, who will work with the Federal Trade Commission to ensure that complaints by EU citizens are investigated and resolved. If a case is not resolved by any of the other means, as a last resort there will be an arbitration mechanism. Redress possibility in the area of national security for EU citizens’ will be handled by an Ombudsperson independent from the US intelligence services.
  • Annual joint review mechanism: the mechanism will monitor the functioning of the Privacy Shield, including the commitments and assurance as regards access to data for law enforcement and national security purposes. The European Commission and the U.S. Department of Commerce will conduct the review and associate national intelligence experts from the U.S. and European Data Protection Authorities. The Commission will draw on all other sources of information available and will issue a public report to the European Parliament and the Council.

Next steps: Privacy Shield framework will be published in the US Federal Register. The U.S. Department of Commerce will start operating the Privacy Shield. Once US companies have had an opportunity to review the framework and update their compliance, companies will be able to certify with the Commerce Department starting August 1st. Companies should assess Privacy Shield’s impact on their EU-U.S. data transfer strategy. In particular, there is a limited “grace period” available in that companies that self-certify within two months of Privacy Shield’s effective date will be given a nine month transitional period to address relationships with third parties.

Please see the US International Trade Administration’s press release for additional information.

EU-US Privacy Shield(Note: This article is an update on our first article about Privacy Shield posted in the February  2016 edition of GZ News.)

~By Ted Haas, Global-Z Chief Marketing Officer (CMO)

On February 2nd, 2016 the US Department of Commerce and European Commission issued a press release that outlined some key changes to the EU-US Safe Harbor; now dubbed the “Privacy Shield.”   This agreement replaces Safe Harbor, which was declared invalid on October 6th, 2015.

Here are some of the key updates since this major decision has been announced.

 

EU-US_Safe_Habor_Dates

 

Overview: What is Privacy Shield?

  • It is a robust framework under which personal data of EU individuals will be protected when it is transferred to the US.
  • It replaces Safe Harbor –declared invalid by EU Court October 6th, 2015.
  • It is a voluntary self-certification to the US Dept. of Commerce.
  • Once a company publicly commits to Privacy Shield, it is enforceable under US law.
  • It includes multiple avenues of redress to resolve complaints.
  • Privacy Shield companies must select an independent dispute resolution organization.
    • Panel created by the EU Data Protection Authorities (DPA’s).
    • Accredited organization in EU.
    • Accredited organization in US.
  • There are special provisions for HR personal information.
  • It is a ‘living commitment’ with annual review.
  • Privacy Shield will be effective with final approval of European Commission (est. June 2016).

 

7 Principles and 16 Supplemental Principles define the core provisions of the Privacy Shield framework.

Main Principles:

  1. Notice
  2. Choice
  3. Accountability for Onward Transfer
  4. Security
  5. Data Integrity and Purpose Limitations
  6. Access
  7. Recourse, Enforcement and Liability

 

16 Supplemental Principles:

  1. Sensitive Data
  2. Journalistic exceptions
  3. Secondary Liability
  4. Performing Due Diligence and Conducting Audits
  5. Role of the Data Protection Authorities
  6. Self – Certification
  7. Verification
  8. Access
  9. Human Resource Data
  10. Obligatory Contracts for Onward Transfers
  11. Dispute Resolution and Enforcement
  12. Choice-Timing of Opt Out
  13. Travel Information
  14. Pharmaceutical and Medical Products
  15. Public Record and Publicly Available Information
  16. Access Requests by Public Authorities

If you would like to discuss Privacy Shield in greater detail and/or the specific impact on your company feel free to contact us any time.

The US Department of Commerce has issued a “Fact Sheet” overview of the EU-US Privacy Shield Framework it can be found here.

Privacy Shield will be complex; we strongly recommend consulting legal counsel with international privacy law expertise.

LockThe US Department of Commerce and European Commission issued press releases this week (Tuesday, Feb 2, 2016) that outline some key changes to the EU-US Safe Harbor; now dubbed the “Privacy Shield.”   This agreement replaces Safe Harbor which was declared invalid October 6, 2015.

Privacy Shield Summary

While the new accord still needs to be reviewed by the Article 29 Working Party and the College of Commissioners, but assuming it remains substantially the same, we can expect the following:

  • More stringent obligations on companies handling Europeans’ personal data and more robust enforcement
  • EU individuals will have access to multiple avenues to resolve concerns, including through alternative dispute resolution at no cost to the individual.
  • The Privacy Shield includes new contractual privacy protections and oversight for data transferred by participating companies to third parties or processed by those companies’ agents to improve accountability and ensure a continuity of protection.
  • Clear safeguards and transparency obligations on U.S. government access.  The US has agreed to an annual joint review with the EU, including with respect to national security access to personal data.

The details currently available are included in press releases issued by the European Commission and the US Department of Commerce; a summary and related links to the releases are here:

Global-Z expects the Commission and FTC will make the entire agreement publicly available soon. After our review of the fully-published agreement, Global-Z will provide you with another update. Importantly, US companies will need to review the new Privacy Shield program carefully before deciding to commit to it.

We will continue to keep you posted. If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.

UPU_Logo~by Paul Harris, Sales and Marketing

Global-Z International’s CEO Dimitri Garder, was recently invited to attend and speak at a new Global Addressing Conference hosted by the Universal Postal Union (UPU) in Berne, Switzerland. The two-day event took place on October 26th & 27th during the UPU Council of Administration session.

The Global Addressing Conference was the first of its kind. The event drew a crowd of more than 160 global addressing industry leaders. Postal operators and regulators, data processing companies, data consultants and private industry project leaders were all in attendance.

The primary focus of the conference was to enhance the understanding the complex issues developing countries face when they don’t have a reliable addressing system. For many years, the UPU has taken the position that addressing is a critical human right, fundamental to provision basic services to all people across the world.

“Developed nations take addressing systems for granted because most all individuals live in an identifiable residence that has an address,” said Garder. “However, underdeveloped countries have huge percentages of their populations that live in slums. These slums were originally intended to be temporary living situations. Unfortunately, they become permanent living situations because of economic and infrastructure issues in these countries.”

For underdeveloped countries with large populations, having no addressing system is a major problem. It’s nearly impossible to find people who have no formal address and sometimes no street names. Some countries have populations who live a nomadic life and move from place to place making the problem even more complex. From a first world perspective, global addressing is important from a commercial context, but for more undeveloped countries, having an addressing system would make the difference to be able to provide basic human services like clean water, electricity and medical relief.

Garder’s presentation focused on why address hygiene is such a critical element in designing and maintaining a reliable addressing system. “The value of an address is directly proportional to the quality of the address. That’s why address hygiene is so important. In order to maximize the value of an address it’s required that the data is regularly cleaned and updated.  A well-managed addressing system can generate significant economic advantages in both the developed and underdeveloped world”, he said.

Representatives from West African nations used examples to demonstrate how no addressing system makes it difficult to fight threats. Citing the recent Ebola crisis, they explained how they couldn’t send first responders to help aid citizens that had no address. It was a major problem.

In contrast to the West Africa discussion, representatives from more developed nations spoke about having 98% of the population in a quality addressing system. Their discussion focused on how to get the remaining 2% in the system, in order to reach 100% of the population.
“When you compare these discussions, the stark contrast is eye opening,” stated Garder. “This conference’s international audience made the event a once in the lifetime experience. For the more underdeveloped countries, the conference raised more questions than it answered.”